Difference between revisions of "G-SIB"

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For this reason, these banks are subject to more stringent regulation and capital adequacy requirements than other institutions.
 
For this reason, these banks are subject to more stringent regulation and capital adequacy requirements than other institutions.
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For example, they are required to hold more capital than other banks.
  
  
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==See also==
 
==See also==
 
* [[Capital adequacy]]
 
* [[Capital adequacy]]
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* [[Contagion]]
 
* [[D-SIB]]
 
* [[D-SIB]]
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* [[Financial Stability Board]] (FSB)
 
* [[G-SIFI]]
 
* [[G-SIFI]]
 
* [[HLA]]
 
* [[HLA]]
 
* [[R-SIB]]
 
* [[R-SIB]]
 
* [[SIB surcharge]]
 
* [[SIB surcharge]]
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* [[Significant institution]]
 
* [[Systemically Important Financial Institution]]
 
* [[Systemically Important Financial Institution]]
 
* [[Too Big To Fail]]
 
* [[Too Big To Fail]]
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==External reference==
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* [https://www.fsb.org/wp-content/uploads/P111120.pdf FSB - G-SIBs list 2020]
  
 
[[Category:Accounting,_tax_and_regulation]]
 
[[Category:Accounting,_tax_and_regulation]]
 
[[Category:The_business_context]]
 
[[Category:The_business_context]]

Latest revision as of 00:06, 18 March 2021

Global systemically important bank.

A G-SIB is a large bank whose potential failure would have widespread negative effects in the broader financial system.

For this reason, these banks are subject to more stringent regulation and capital adequacy requirements than other institutions.

For example, they are required to hold more capital than other banks.


UK-headquartered G-SIBs include HSBC, Barclays and Standard Chartered Bank.


See also


External reference